Anthropology Peer Reviewed Articles

Reviews on Anthropology Peer Reviewed Articles

Order Description
This is a literature review, sorry there was no option so i clicked book review.

A literature review is an essential part of preliminary research in any field, and learning how to do one will help you to perform better in any subject asking you to conduct independent research. The assessment is designed to teach you about how to use scientific articles and databases, evaluate sources, and better understand scientific debates.

The literature review is primarily a library-based assignment that can be conducted online, especially using the Macquarie University Library�s extensive database and journal collection. Students are encouraged to find a recent article in a scientific journal (peer reviewed, which means articles are reviewed by other scientists before publication); good places to start include www.sciencedaily.com (especially www.sciencedaily.com/news/fossils_ruins/human_evolution/) and www.sciencenews.org, which has an excellent �anthropology� section under the �Humans� heading.

These are not peer-reviewed journals, but they contain short, easy-to-read press releases and news stories based on recently published, scientific articles. The student must then track down the original article; the citation is usually on the page of the news release, but the student will have to find the journal using the Library�s �Journal Finder.�

The student must then copy the citation accurately, write IN HIS OR HER OWN WORDS, a summary of the crucial finding or research result, and the reason for its importance.

Then the student must track down previous scientific, peer-reviewed journal articles on the same subject, especially works cited in the primary (first) article, or that cite the primary article. This may be made easier using the �Web of Science� database, available through the Library�s database collection.

The student must compile a MINIMUM of five sources that describe or analyze different findings, some of which may contradict the original primary article, write the citation and summary for each, and complete the assignment with a 200-word or less description of the whole debate.

The assessment task will be evaluated based on the number and quality of sources; the accuracy and organization of the citations; the quality of the summaries (with no credit given for plagiarism); the evidence of research skill; and the quality of the summary paragraph. The whole assessment is likely to take less than four pages to write up. Although the assessment may be challenging at first, the desired outcome is that the student have a much better understanding of archival research techniques and how academic debates are carried out across peer-reviewed publications.